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Crazy Money

w/ Paul Olliger

Crazy Money exists to promote financial wisdom and better living through no-holds-barred conversations about the role of money in our lives.Here is what you missed.

Giving thanks, literally (w/A.J. Jacobs)

Listen to Giving thanks, literally (w/A.J. Jacobs)
In this special Thanksgiving encore episode, I talk to A.J. Jacobs about his latest book, Thanks a Thousand: A Gratitude Journey, in which he expresses gratitude to a thousand people who are involved with getting him his morning coffee.

A.J. Jacobs is an author, journalist, lecturer and human guinea pig. He has written four New York Times bestsellers that combine memoir, science, humor, and a dash of self-help. He is also editor at large at Esquire magazine, a commentator on NPR and a columnist for Mental Floss magazine. 

Despite his references to the hygienic benefits of not shaking hands, this interview was recorded in pre-COVID 2019 at his office in New York City.

Learn more about A.J. on his website.

**Please rate and review Crazy Money here.

Follow Crazy Money on Facebook here and join the Crazy Money Listeners Group here.

Get your official Crazy Money t-shirts here

Produced and edited by Mike Carano

About Crazy Money:

Unlike traditional personal finance shows like Dave Ramsey or Suze Orman, Crazy Money is not about how to make a million bucks, how to beat the market, or how to save money by switching cable providers. It is about deciding what role we want money to play in our lives and how we can use it to be our best selves. Topics covered include: Philosophy, Happiness, Contentment, Meaning, dreams, purpose, Success, Rat Race, Society, mental health, Buddhism, Stoicism, the hedonic treadmill, morality, Mid-Life Crisis, Business, Work, Careers, Authors, Books, Consumerism, Values, capitalism, economics, investing, saving, spending, personal finance, charity, philanthropy, altruism, affluence, wealth, wealth management, culture, society. Status. Paul Ollinger 

Are you really still reading this?

Life after the PGA Championship (w/Rich Beem)

Listen to Life after the PGA Championship (w/Rich Beem)
Rich Beem won the 2002 PGA Championship, one of professional golf’s four major tournaments. Despite having won twice on tour prior to the PGA, Rich's win at Hazeltine was as unlikely as the groovy dance moves he busted out after sinking his final putt of the tournament. Describing himself as “the luckiest guy in the world,” Rich loves golf and hanging out with people who give him energy. He played the game loose and wide open, but the rising expectations he felt after becoming a major champion became a distraction, and he never won again on tour.
 
On today’s Crazy Money, Rich speaks candidly about grinding his way up the golf ladder, and how he found purpose and meaning in life as his PGA prospects began to dim. 
 
Rich was born in Phoenix, AZ, grew up in El Paso, TX and played college golf at New Mexico State University. Today Rich plays on the PGA Champions Tour and works as a TV golf analyst on Sky Sports in the UK and Ireland.
 
Follow Rich on Instagram and/or Twitter
 
**Please rate and review Crazy Money here.

Follow Crazy Money on Facebook here and join the Crazy Money Listeners Group here.

Get your official Crazy Money t-shirts here

Produced and edited by Mike Carano

About Crazy Money:

Unlike traditional personal finance shows like Dave Ramsey or Suze Orman, Crazy Money is not about how to make a million bucks, how to beat the market, or how to save money by switching cable providers. It is about deciding what role we want money to play in our lives and how we can use it to be our best selves. Topics covered include: Philosophy, Happiness, Contentment, Meaning, dreams, purpose, Success, Rat Race, Society, mental health, Buddhism, Stoicism, the hedonic treadmill, morality, Mid-Life Crisis, Business, Work, Careers, Authors, Books, Consumerism, Values, capitalism, economics, investing, saving, spending, personal finance, charity, philanthropy, altruism, affluence, wealth, wealth management, culture, society. Status. Paul Ollinger 

Are you really still reading this?

In defense of the Preppy (w/Lisa Birnbach)

Listen to In defense of the Preppy (w/Lisa Birnbach)
Lisa Birnbach is the author of over 20 books, includingThe Official Preppy Handbook, a cultural phenomenon from the early 1980’s. The book sold more than a million copies and has been cited as an inspiration to the founder of J. Crew and is thought to have boosted the growth of LL Bean. 
 
InT.O.P.H., Birnbach celebrated, skewered, and democratized the concept of preppiness, with writing the The New York Times described as “affectionate but acerbic.” Upon re-visiting the book, I found her reflections on money, fashion, status, and the social hierarchy as insightful and hilarious today as they were forty years ago. In this thoroughly enjoyable interview, we talk about the preppy aesthetic, Connecticut, and how the world has (and hasn’t) changed since she launched this juggernaut into being. 
 
Celebrated for her keen eye and sharp wit, Lisa Birnbach is an award-winning journalist, cultural commentator, and bestselling author. She has written for The New York Times, The New Yorker, Parade, Rolling Stone, and New York magazine. You should check out her podcast, 5 Things with Lisa Birnbach. Lisa spoke to me from her home on the Upper West Side of Manhattan.
 
 
See more about Lisa here - https://lisabirnbach.com/
 
**Please rate and review Crazy Money here.

Follow Crazy Money on Facebook here and join the Crazy Money Listeners Group here.

Get your official Crazy Money t-shirts here
 
Pre-order Joshua Brown and Brian Portnoy's How I Invest My Money here.

Produced and edited by Mike Carano

About Crazy Money:

Unlike traditional personal finance shows like Dave Ramsey or Suze Orman, Crazy Money is not about how to make a million bucks, how to beat the market, or how to save money by switching cable providers. It is about deciding what role we want money to play in our lives and how we can use it to be our best selves. Topics covered include: Philosophy, Happiness, Contentment, Meaning, dreams, purpose, Success, Rat Race, Society, mental health, Buddhism, Stoicism, the hedonic treadmill, morality, Mid-Life Crisis, Business, Work, Careers, Authors, Books, Consumerism, Values, capitalism, economics, investing, saving, spending, personal finance, charity, philanthropy, altruism, affluence, wealth, wealth management, culture, society. Status.

Are you really still reading?

Brad Klontz, Financial Psychologist to Billionaires (Rebroadcast from Aug, 2019)

Listen to Brad Klontz, Financial Psychologist to Billionaires (Rebroadcast from Aug, 2019)
Dr. Brad Klontz is a psychologist and certified financial planner. He helps his clients (many of whom are ultra-high net worth individuals or even billionaires) understand how what they learned about money as kids affects their attitudes and dysfunctions today. 
 
This week, both Paul and his editor/producer extraordinaire Mike Carano take Brad's Money Disorder Assessment and discuss their results in the hope he can cure them of their money ills.
 
Brad’s work has been featured inThe Wall Street JournalNew York TimesWashington PostLos Angeles TimesTimeKiplinger’sMoney, NPR and many other media outlets and professional magazines and journals. He is the author of several books, includingMind Over Money. 
 
Take his Money Disorder Assessment here. Check out his YouTube Channel
 
Please take a moment to rate Crazy Money here

Find out more about Crazy Money and Paul Ollinger on his website and/or follow him on the socials: 

• Twitter: http://Twitter.com/Paul_Ollinger

• Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/paul_ollinger/

• Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/PaulOllinger/

• LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/paulollinger/

Produced and edited by Mike Carano

Topics addressed in this episode include:

Topics addressed on Crazy Money include: Philosophy, Happiness, Contentment, Meaning, dreams, purpose, Success, Rat Race, Society, mental health, Buddhism, Stoicism, the hedonic treadmill, morality, Mid-Life Crisis, Business, Work, Careers, Authors, Books, Consumerism, Values, capitalism, economics, investing, saving, spending, personal finance, charity, philanthropy, altruism, affluence, wealth, wealth management, culture, society. Status.

Now listen, I’m happy you’re here, but if you haven’t found what you’re looking for in the words above, you’re probably not going to find them down here. Seriously, all the important stuff is up yonder. 

Netflix’s Bad Boy Billionaires (with Dylan Mohan Gray)

Listen to Netflix’s Bad Boy Billionaires (with Dylan Mohan Gray)
Dylan Mohan Gray is the director of The King of Good Times, the pilot film of the new Netflix series, Bad Boy Billionaires: India, which has been the most viewed show in India for much of October. The film chronicles the rise and fall of Vijay Mallya, heir to a brewing fortune and founder of Kingfisher Airlines.
 
Vijay was known for his excessive lifestyle, over-the-top personality, and lavish investments in sexy, high-profile ventures like cricket and Formula One racing teams. Despite his massive affluence, Vijay is accused of money laundering and fraud, which is said to have arisen from financial recklessness and over-reaching at his growing airline. 
 
In this episode, Dylan and I discuss not only Vijay’s story, but how his excessive ambition, over-confidence, and lack of a sense of enough got him— and others who already have way more than they need — into big, big trouble. 
 
An award-winning documentarian, Dylan also directed Fire in the Blood, which explored the high price of AIDS drugs in the developing world. The film was an official selection of the Sundance Film Festival and The Wall Street Journal called it “powerfully cinematic and vitally important.” 
 
Dylan holds an AB in History and Film from Dartmouth College and an MA in Contemporary History from Central European University.
 

Read Paul Ollinger’s latest essays on Medium.

Please take a second to rate and review Crazy Money here. (Click on whichever app you use to listen!)

Join the discussion on the Crazy Money Podcast Listeners’ group on Facebook here

Produced and edited by Mike Carano

Topics addressed on Crazy Money include: Philosophy, Happiness, Contentment, Meaning, dreams, purpose, Success, Rat Race, Society, mental health, Buddhism, Stoicism, the hedonic treadmill, morality, Mid-Life Crisis, Business, Work, Careers, Authors, Books, Consumerism, Values, capitalism, economics, investing, saving, spending, personal finance, charity, philanthropy, altruism, affluence, wealth, wealth management, culture, society. Status.

Are you really still reading? Dude, you need a hobby.

Family Fortune & Misfortune (w/ Janny Scott)

Listen to Family Fortune & Misfortune (w/ Janny Scott)
Janny Scott grew up on an 800-acre estate near Philadelphia. The descendant of railroad barons and financial magnates, Janny tracks the effects of her family’s multi-generational wealth in her book, The Beneficiary: Fortune, Misfortune, and the Story of My Father. In the book, she lays the details of both the opulence and the tragic complications of her family’s vast resources. While things appeared perfect from the outside, alcoholism, suicide, divorce, and idleness derailed many of her relations.
 
In this conversation, we discuss what it was like to grow up on property the size of Central Park and how the presence of so much wealth affects her attitudes about money today. We also cover the tragedies that befell many of her ancestors as they struggled to find purpose amidst massive affluence. 
 
Janny worked for fourteen years as a reporter for the New York Times where she was a member of the team that won the 2000 Pulitzer Prize for national reporting. Prior to the NYT, she reported for the LA Times and The Record of Bergen County (NJ). Her first book, A Singular Woman: The Untold Story of Barack Obama’s Mother earned her a nomination for the PEN/Jacqueline Bogard Weld Award for Biography and was named to Time magazine’s top ten nonfiction books of 2011. Her recent book was one of the NYT 100 Notable Books of 2019 and NPR’s Favorite Books of 2019. Janny has made appearances on The Colbert Report, Today, C-Span, Fresh Air and many other national TV and radio shows. She is a graduate of Harvard College and spoke with me from her home in New York City.
 
Learn more about Janny’s work on her website.
 
Download Peter Singer’s book,The Life You Can Savefor free hereor listen to the audiobook on Spotifyor Apple Podcasts. You can also listen to my interview with Peter here.
 

Join the new Crazy Money Listeners Group on Facebook here

Read Paul's latest essays on Medium.

Please take a second to rate and review Crazy Money here.

Crazy Money is produced and edited by Mike Carano. Topics addressed on Crazy Money include:Philosophy, Happiness, Contentment, Meaning, dreams, purpose, Success, Rat Race, Society, mental health, Buddhism, Stoicism, the hedonic treadmill, morality, Mid-Life Crisis, Business, Work, Careers, Authors, Books, Consumerism, Values, capitalism, economics, investing, saving, spending, personal finance, charity, philanthropy, altruism, affluence, wealth, wealth management, culture, society. Status.

If you haven’t found what you’re looking for in the words above, you’re probably not going to find them down here. Seriously, all the important stuff is up yonder. 

Asian-American Attitudes About Money and Success (w/Kathy Wang)

Listen to Asian-American Attitudes About Money and Success (w/Kathy Wang)
Kathy Wang grew up in Northern California and graduated from UC Berkeley and Harvard Business School. After working in the technology field for four years, she quit her job and wrote her first novel, Family Trust, which is the story of the Huangs, a first-generation Chinese-American family. With their father dying and his second wife waiting, the adult kids are wondering what will become of their father’s estate. 
 
The book and this conversation explore differences in cultural attitudes toward careers, success, and money among Asian-American families. Said Kathy, “In Asian culture, you’ll always feel inadequate. I don’t think I’ve ever met an Asian person, no matter where they are in life, (who) feel that they’re doing a great job.” 
 
Kathy lives in the Bay Area with her husband and two young children. She is working on her second book, which will be out soon.
 
Find out more about Kathy here: http://www.bykathywang.com/
 
Read Paul’s latest essay on Medium.
 
Please take a second to rate and review Crazy Money here.

Join the Crazy Money Facebook Group.

Produced and edited by Mike Carano

Topics addressed in this episode include: writing, fiction, novels, business school, MBA, working mom, venture capital, Silicon Valley, technology, careers, anxiety, respect, immigration, immigrants.

Topics addressed on Crazy Money include: Philosophy, Happiness, Contentment, Meaning, dreams, purpose, Success, Rat Race, Society, mental health, Buddhism, Stoicism, the hedonic treadmill, morality, Mid-Life Crisis, Business, Work, Careers, Authors, Books, Consumerism, Values, capitalism, economics, investing, saving, spending, personal finance, charity, philanthropy, altruism, affluence, wealth, wealth management, Paul Ollinger 

The Psychology of Money (w/ Morgan Housel)

Listen to The Psychology of Money (w/ Morgan Housel)

Morgan Housel is the author of the new book, The Psychology of Money: Timeless Lessons on Wealth, Greed, and Happiness. Success with investing and maintaining wealth is less about quantitative skill than it is about consistency and self-awareness. As the back cover of his new best-seller reads, “Doing well with money isn’t necessarily about what you know. It’s about how you behave. And behavior is hard to teach, even to really smart people."

Morgan’s book is an elegant summation of many of the things I want to discuss on this show. While it is partially about investing, it’s really about how knowing what you want from life will help you make better decisions about money.

A partner at the Collaborative Fund and a former columnist at The Motley Fool and The Wall Street Journal, Morgan is a two-time winner of the Best in Business Award from the Society of American Business Editors and Writers, winner of the New York Times Sidney Award, and a two-time finalist for the Gerald Loeb Award for Distinguished Business and Financial Journalism. His work was featured in The Best Business Writing published by the Columbia Journalism Review

Learn more about Morgan on his website
 
Read Paul's latest essays on Medium. Please take a second to rate and review Crazy Money here. (Click on whichever app you use to listen!)

Find out more about Crazy Money and Paul Ollinger on his website and/or follow him on the socials: 

• Twitter: http://Twitter.com/Paul_Ollinger

• Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/paul_ollinger/

• Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/PaulOllinger/

• LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/paulollinger/

Produced and edited by Mike Carano

Topics addressed in this episode include: investing, stocks, bonds, equities, financial planning, portfolios, allocation, behavioral economics.

Topics addressed on Crazy Money include: Philosophy, Happiness, Contentment, Meaning, dreams, purpose, Success, Rat Race, Society, mental health, Buddhism, Stoicism, the hedonic treadmill, morality, Mid-Life Crisis, Business, Work, Careers, Authors, Books, Consumerism, Values, capitalism, economics, investing, saving, spending, personal finance, charity, philanthropy, altruism, affluence, wealth, wealth management.

Now listen, I’m happy you’re here, but if you haven’t found what you’re looking for in the words above, you’re probably not going to find them down here. Seriously, all the important stuff is up yonder. 

Olympic Economics (w/ Apolo Ohno)

Listen to Olympic Economics (w/ Apolo Ohno)
With eight Olympic medals (two of them gold), Apolo Ohno is America’s most decorated winter Olympian. He won his first major speed skating title (the US Championships) at the tender age of 14, after only six months of training. He continued on to a career that played a major role in establishing short-track speed-skating in the 2002, 2006, and 2010 Winter Games. 
 
His New York Times best-selling memoir, Zero Regrets, tells the story of success, setbacks and what it takes to become one of the top athletes in the world. In this episode, Apolo and I go deep into the economic realities of becoming an Olympian. Due to the steep cost of coaching, training, equipment, and travel, many (perhaps most) athletes and their families go deep into debt in pursuit of a spot on the national team. And even for the few who make it, there is little preparation for post-Games remuneration and little preparation for a job “in the real world."
 
In his post-skating career, Apolo has worked as a sports analyst for NBC, a global ambassador for the Olympics, and a winner of ABC’s hit show, Dancing with the Stars. He finished the 2014 Ironman World Championship Triathlon in less than ten hours. Apolo now spends much of his time speaking to business and nonprofit leaders around the globe. He helps leaders develop high-performance mindset to break through and do their best work. 
 
His next book Hard Pivot tells the story of reinvention and tackling new challenges while maintaining his iconic positive attitude and unmatched energy.  Thank you to Apolo’s assistant, Lucy Chen for making this happen!
 
To learn more or book Apolo to speak, visit  https://www.apoloohno.com/
 
Here’s how you pronounce “infinitesimal.”
 
Please take a second to rate and review Crazy Money here. (Click on whichever app you use to listen!)

Find out more about Crazy Money and Paul Ollinger on his website and/or follow him on the socials: 

• Twitter: http://Twitter.com/Paul_Ollinger

• Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/paul_ollinger/

• Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/PaulOllinger/

• LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/paulollinger/

Produced and edited by Mike Carano 

Topics addressed in this episode include: performance, motivation, achievement, retirement, reinvention, regrets.

Topics addressed on Crazy Money include: Philosophy, Happiness, Contentment, Meaning, dreams, purpose, Success, Rat Race, Society, mental health, Buddhism, Stoicism, the hedonic treadmill, morality, Mid-Life Crisis, Business, Work, Careers, Retirement, Reinvention, Authors, Books, Consumerism, Values, capitalism, economics, investing, saving, spending, personal finance, charity, philanthropy, altruism, affluence, wealth, wealth management.

Now listen, I’m happy you’re here, but if you haven’t found what you’re looking for in the words above, you’re probably not going to find them down here. Seriously, all the important stuff is up yonder. 

Talking About Wealth (w/Jennifer Risher)

Listen to Talking About Wealth (w/Jennifer Risher)
As early Microsoft employees, Jennifer and her future-husband, David Risher, made millions of dollars from their stock options in the quickly growing company. When David joined an online book-seller called Amazon, those “millions” became “tens of millions,” and Jen found herself nervously navigating the world of affluence. 
 
In her new book, We Need to Talk: A Memoir About Wealth, she explores the mind-bending experience of earning way more than she needed or ever imagined. While acknowledging their very good fortune, she nevertheless found herself dealing with guilt, awkward social situations, imposter syndrome, and the loss of identity that comes when you stop working.  
 
There are over 18 million millionaires in the United States. Most of them did not grow up with a lot of money, so they had to learn how to handle it. Yet, talking about having money is considered extremely rude. A recent Money Matters study found that 68% of people would rather talk about their weight than money. And more people are more comfortable talking about sex than talking about money. 
 
So how the hell are you supposed to figure it out? 
 
In her new book, Jen shares her thought-provoking, personal story, including the voices of others in her demographic to help us explore the hidden impact of wealth on our brains, relationships, and sense of place in the world. 
 
Jennifer Risher was born in Seattle, Washington, grew up in Oregon, and graduated from Connecticut College. She joined Microsoft in 1991 where she worked as a recruiter and then as a product manager. She and her husband, David, have two daughters and live in San Francisco, where David is CEO of Worldreader, a nonprofit he cofounded with a mission to create a world where everyone is a reader.  
 
Learn more about Jennifer and the book on her website

Please take a second to rate and review Crazy Money here. (Click on whichever app you use to listen!)

Find out more about Crazy Money and Paul Ollinger on his website and/or follow him on the socials: 

• Twitter: http://Twitter.com/Paul_Ollinger

• Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/paul_ollinger/

• Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/PaulOllinger/

• LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/paulollinger/

Produced and edited by Mike Carano

Topics addressed in this episode include: wealth, affluence, wants v. needs, careers, working mother, millionaires.

Topics addressed on Crazy Money include: Philosophy, Happiness, Contentment, Meaning, dreams, purpose, Success, Rat Race, Society, mental health, Buddhism, Stoicism, the hedonic treadmill, morality, Mid-Life Crisis, Business, Work, Careers, Authors, Books, Consumerism, Values, capitalism, economics, investing, saving, spending, personal finance, charity, philanthropy, altruism, affluence  wealth, wealth management.

Now listen, I’m happy you’re here, but if you haven’t found what you’re looking for in the words above, you’re probably not going to find them down here. Seriously, all the important stuff is up yonder. 

Guy Raz on building How I Built This

Listen to Guy Raz on building How I Built This
Guy Raz is the host and co-creator of the smash NPR program, How I Built This and author of a new book by the same name. On the show, Guy provides entrepreneurs a platform to share their company’s origin stories and the trials and tribulations involved in getting their companies off the ground. In the new book, Guy goes deeper, reflecting on all he’s learned about what makes founders click. 

In addition to How I Built This, Guy is the  co-creator of TED Radio Hour and Wow in the World, the first NPR podcast for kids. His programs reach over 14 million people every month. 

Before becoming one of the best-known podcasters in history, Guy was a war reporter and foreign correspondent. In 2000 NPR named Guy the bureau chief in Berlin where he covered Eastern Europe and the Balkans. He was just 25 years old. During his six years abroad, he reported from more than 40 countries including the wars in Iraq, Afghanistan, and Macedonia. For his reporting from Iraq, Guy won both the Edward R. Murrow Award and the Daniel Schorr Journalism prize. His reporting has contributed to two duPont awards and one Peabody awarded to NPR. 

Guy worked as CNN’s Jerusalem correspondent from 2004-2006, after which he returned to NPR and served as defense correspondent, covering the Pentagon and the US military. 

Learn more about Guy on his website
Please take a second to rate and review Crazy Money here. (Click on whichever app you use to listen!)
Find out more about Crazy Money and Paul Ollinger on his website and/or follow him on the socials: 
• Twitter: http://Twitter.com/Paul_Ollinger
• Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/paul_ollinger/
• Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/PaulOllinger/
• LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/paulollinger/

Produced and edited by Mike Carano

Topics addressed in this episode include: Entrepreneurship, venture capital, Entrepreneurs, Founders, start-ups, startups, leadership, radio, NPR, innovation, Sara Blakely, Spanx, Jim Koch, Boston Beer.

Topics addressed on Crazy Money include: Philosophy, Happiness, Contentment, Meaning, dreams, purpose, Success, Rat Race, Society, mental health, Buddhism, Stoicism, the hedonic treadmill, morality, Mid-Life Crisis, Business, Work, Careers, Authors, Books, Consumerism, Values, capitalism, economics, investing, saving, spending, personal finance, charity, philanthropy, altruism, wealth, wealth management.

Now listen, I’m happy you’re here, but if you haven’t found what you’re looking for in the words above, you’re probably not going to find them down here. Seriously, all the important stuff is up yonder. 

Net fulfillment v. Net worth (with Bill Perkins)

Listen to Net fulfillment v. Net worth (with Bill Perkins)
Would you consider yourself a success if you died with $1 million? How about $10 million? Well, what if you died with $0.00? 
 
In his new book, Die With Zero: Getting All you Can from Your Money and Your Life, Bill Perkins challenges you to flout conventional wisdom and spend your money not just before you’re dead, but while you’re still young enough to enjoy it. That’s right, instead of maximizing your net worth at death, he wants you to die having lived a life rich in experiences that your hard-earned money made possible. And he’s not saying you should blow it all on parties or ignore the needs of your kids or charities. He’s just saying that the time to decide how to best invest, spend, gift, or bequeath your fortune--big or small--is while you are still on this side of the dirt and still mobile enough to enjoy it. After all, travel is no fun when you’re too infirm to explore and savor the local culture. So dither not!  There will be plenty of time to watch Family Feud and The Price is Right when you’re 87 and stuck in your recliner. 
 
Called “the last cowboy” by The Wall Street Journal, Bill Perkins is one of the world’s most successful hedge fund managers and entrepreneurs. After studying electrical engineering at the University of Iowa, Bill worked on Wall Street then moved to Houston where he made a fortune as an energy trader. He is currently CEO of BrisaMax Holdings, a consulting services firm based in the U.S. Virgin Islands. Now 51 years-old, Bill views his career as an engine for personal growth and spends his time exploring the world, savoring his relationships, and taking in all that life has to offer. 
 
Read more about Bill and the book here
 
Please take a second to rate and review Crazy Money here. (Click on whichever app you use to listen!)

Find out more about Crazy Money and Paul Ollinger on his website and/or follow him on the socials: 

• Twitter: http://Twitter.com/Paul_Ollinger

• Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/paul_ollinger/

• Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/PaulOllinger/

• LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/paulollinger/

Produced and edited by Mike Carano.

Topics addressed on Crazy Money include: Philosophy, Happiness, Contentment, Meaning, Success, Rat Race, Buddhism, Stoicism, The hedonic treadmill, Mid-Life Crisis, Business, Work, Careers, Authors, Books, Consumerism, Values.

Okay, you’ve reached the end of this episode description. And yet you’re still reading. Why? You must not have much going on today. Hey, have you rated and reviewed this fine podcast yet? You should. So either go back to the podcast page (the page about the whole show, not just this episode) and scroll down, way down to where you see “Rate and Review,” then do your thing. Or, as I say above, click here

Affluence, Insolvency, and Alcohol (with Kirkland Hamill)

Listen to Affluence, Insolvency, and Alcohol (with Kirkland Hamill)
Kirkland Hamill’s grandfather was very rich. His mother and father raised him and his brothers in grand fashion until Grandpa's death exposed major cracks in the family fortune. When his dad left his mom, she took Kirkland and his brothers to Bermuda where they attended a prestigious school, but never knew how they were going to pay for groceries. 
 
In his first book, Filthy Beasts, Kirkland tells the story of a youth spent in flux between affluence and the alcoholism that came with the country clubs and yachts of his early childhood, and the deprivation and calamity of the years beyond that. The book is sad but immensely engaging and full of stories that will leave you gobsmacked. For example, because life in his mother’s home was chaotic, he decided he’d attend boarding school at Andover (as one does when they can’t afford milk) and then attend college at Tulane.
 
The whole story makes you wonder what the point of money or status or social standing is if when one can’t — or chooses not to — provide a stable, loving home for their children. It also makes you think, “maybe I should be a bit more empathetic to others" because I have no idea what someone is dealing or has dealt with in their lives. 
 
The good news is that, through Al-Anon and self-determination, Kirkland found himself, his calling, and a stable-adulthood. He currently resides in Baltimore with his husband, Dave, and a dog named Blue. His writing has appeared in Salon, The Advocate, and will likely be appearing in a whole bunch of other places based on the quality and success of this inaugural effort. 
 
Find out more about Kirkland and order the book on his https://kirklandhamill.com/
 
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Crazy Money is produced and edited by Mike Carano.

Topics addressed on Crazy Money include: Philosophy, Happiness, Contentment, Meaning, Success, Rat Race, Buddhism, Stoicism, The hedonic treadmill, Mid-Life Crisis, Business, Work, Careers, Authors, Books, Consumerism, Values.

Now listen, I’m happy you’re here, but if you haven’ve found what you’re looking for in the words above, you’re probably not going to find them down here. Seriously, all the important stuff is up yonder. 

Happiness is Making a Living with Your Hands (with Ken Rusk)

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Ken Rusk has made a very good living by working with his hands. A true-life, self-described “ditch-digger,” Ken is an entrepreneur who has over 200 people working on his team. In his new book, Blue Collar Cash: Love Your Work, Secure Your Future, and Find Happiness for Life, Ken advocates an alternative career path to anyone who doesn’t believe “college + white collar job” is the route for them. 
 
Ken doesn't believe that university life is wrong for everyone, but he argues that society over-emphasizes the necessity of getting that degree regardless of the massive tuition and debt millions take on in pursuit thereof. Happiness, he argues is in finding work that suits your skills and personality. That’s the situation in which one will find comfort, peace and freedom (not to mention financial security) in one’s career. 
 
In this week’s episode of Crazy Money Paul and Ken discuss work ethic, the true sources of happiness, and career satisfaction. 
Special guest-host: Steve Sidles (Paul’s father-in-law who, unlike his dumb son-in-law, knows how to work with his hands)
 
Learn more about Ken and his book here .

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Find out more about Paul Ollinger on his website and/or follow him on the socials: 

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Produced and edited by Mike Carano 

Topics addressed on Crazy Money include: Philosophy, Happiness, Contentment, Meaning, Success, Rat Race, Buddhism, Stoicism, The hedonic treadmill, Mid-Life Crisis, Business, Work, Careers, Authors, Books, Consumerism, Values.

Now listen, I’m happy you’re here, but if you haven’ve found what you’re looking for in the words above, you’re probably not going to find them down here. Seriously, all the important stuff is up yonder. 

More Choice Makes Us More Miserable (with Barry Schwartz)

Listen to More Choice Makes Us More Miserable (with Barry Schwartz)
Barry Schwartz is the author of several books, including Why We Work and The Paradox of Choice. I spoke to Barry about his findings in these two important books. 
 
Why is it that the harder we work and the more affluent we become, the more depressed we get? Prevailing social wisdom is that more is better, and that more choices should yield more satisfaction, but that is not the case at all. More choice not only overwhelms us, it raises our expectations and makes us doubt our decision-making. Too much choice doesn’t just not make us happier, it increases our anxiety and makes us less happy. 
 
Could it be, even in our freedom loving country, that we have gotten too much of a good thing? That we would actually benefit from some guardrails in our lives? I’m sure there are those who would argue against it, but Barry’s research and conclusions here are quite persuasive. 
 
Barry Schwartz taught psychology at Swarthmore College for 45 years and is now Visiting Professor of Management at UC Berkeley’s Haas School of Business. He holds an M.A. and a Ph.D. from Univeristy of Pennsylvania, and a B.S. from New York University. His TED Talks on the topics of work, choice, and wisdom have been viewed over 20 million times. 
 

Find out more about Crazy Money and Paul Ollinger on his website and/or follow him on the socials: 

• Twitter: http://Twitter.com/Paul_Ollinger

• Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/paul_ollinger/

• Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/PaulOllinger/

• LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/paulollinger/

Produced and edited by Mike Carano

Topics addressed on Crazy Money include: Philosophy, Happiness, Contentment, Meaning, Success, Rat Race, Buddhism, Stoicism, The hedonic treadmill, Mid-Life Crisis, Authors, Books, Consumerism, and Values.